Important Member Information

  • It is important for all members to update their member information with the Union. The Union should be notified of any change in name, address, phone number, beneficiary, and/or employment status.
  • If you leave the collective bargaining unit due to retirement, promotion, or termination, you should obtain a Withdrawal Card from Local 5. This procedure will keep your membership in good standing with the union; and, should you return to the bargaining unit, you will only be assessed a low reinstatement fee.(Retirees, contact Local 5′s Dues Department for information on Death Burial Insurance)
  • It is important for all members to maintain their membership dues on a monthly basis to avoid membership suspension.

Keep These Numbers Handy

Local 5 Offices
1516 S King St.
Honolulu, HI 96826
Phone: (808) 941-2141
Fax: (808) 941-2166
Toll Free: (800) 585-4373

BRMS – Benefit & Risk Management Services
Gentry Pacific Design Center
560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Ste 209,
Honolulu, HI 96817
(Next to City Mill Iwilei)
Phone: (808) 523-0199
Toll Free: 1 (866) 772-8989

Pacific Southwest Administrators – PWSA (Claims Administrator)
60 N. Nimitz Hwy., # 217E
Honolulu, Hawaii 96817
Phone: (844) 357-1081
Toll Free: (866) 377-3977

Hotel & Travel Industry Federal Credit Union
1600 Kapiolani Blvd., Suite 110
Honolulu, HI 96814
Phone: (808) 942-5115
Toll Free: (800) 954-4405

Contract Enforcement

Your Union contract is a legal agreement between Local 5 and your employer that establishes your terms of employment and rights on the job. Contract enforcement is the process by which Local 5 enforces your rights under the contract.

If management violates your rights, (it makes no difference whether the violation is unintentional or deliberate), the Union can challenge the violation. The point is that all violations are harmful and should be contested to uphold the meaning and integrity of your contract. All employees-especially shop stewards-must be vigilant about their contractual rights. The following pages cite six reasons why regular and systematic contract enforcement is so crucial.

Regular and systematic contract enforcement is crucial to you and your Union for the following six reasons:

  • It guarantees our members their “money’s worth.” Regular and systematic contract enforcement ensures that all the benefits and protections that were negotiated and agreed to at the bargaining table are extended to everyone, who is covered by the contract.
  • Regular enforcement gives meaning to your Union contract. No matter how carefully it is written, no contract can anticipate every question that arises under it. Applying and enforcing the contract under various circumstances helps to give it added meaning.
  • It helps to improve your contract. Contract enforcement is an ongoing process that reveals the strengths and weaknesses of your negotiated work agreements. The grievances we lose help to point out the contract’s weaknesses. Those disputes that we win help to highlight the contract’s strengths. Properly publicized, contract weaknesses can help to build membership support for future negotiations.
  • It helps the Union’s organizing efforts. Workers will want to join the Union if they see that it enforces its contracts.
  • Regular contract enforcement also gains the respect of management. When management knows that Local 5 is determined to uphold the terms and conditions of its labor agreements, they will think twice before violating them. This gains respect for our Union and its membership.
  • Regular contract enforcement helps to retain the loyalty of our members. Even the best Union contract is a promise of things to come. If our Union is to win the support of its members in other areas, Local 5 first must make certain that its promises or contracts are fulfilled and enforced.

Membership Dues

Once a person signs a union authorization card, an initiation fee will be assessed and membership dues will commence. (normally, 31 days after the date of hire depending on the contract). Initiation fees are deducted through payroll in increments along with the current month’s dues.

The determination of the amount of dues depends on the contract between the employer and the Union. That could include a flat rate or a small percentage of your gross wages plus a base rate set forth by the contract. For example, for most Hotel Agreements, the calculation of dues is as follows: 1% of gross wages + base rate = monthly dues. Please contact the Local 5 dues department to confirm the current base rate.

NOTE: For members who work part-time, on call, on sick leave or TDI, or on a leave of absence, a minimum amount will be assessed for membership dues each month. It is the responsibility of the member to make self-payments and maintain their dues on a timely basis. Please contact the Local 5 dues department to confirm the current minimum dues amount.